Wednesday, December 23, 2009

Korean Vest

Accession Number: A.8416.64-4d


This blue A-line vest is made of a gauzy synthetic fabric woven with a repeating leaf motif. There are wide hems on the front of the garment and on the armholes, with smaller seams on the back and side vents. All interior seams are left raw. After construction, the garment was stamped with small, silver floral and decorative motifs. There are also two silver medallions stamped on the front of the garment. The garment is not lined.

During deconstruction, seams near the two front medallions were removed and the printed medallions were cut from the garment. A small strip of fabric was also cut.

The strip of fabric was folded in half lengthwise and pressed. Each side was then folded in half lengthwise and pressed. The strip was folded again, pressed, and topstitched to form a hanging strap for the ornament. The medallions were placed right-sides together and pinned. The hanging strap was placed between them, with the ends sticking out. Using the outside edge of the printed medallion as a stitch line, all three were machine sewn together, leaving a small gap at one side. The ornament was then turned right-side out and loosely stuffed with fiber fill. Two nickels were inserted to weight the ornament, which was then hand-sewn closed.

The accession number has been engraved on a small metal disk which is attached to the hanging strap.

Thursday, December 17, 2009

Blue Bolivian Blanket (2nd Use)

Accession Number: TR8616-35


Label: Bolivia, 12-12-86, Conley


Note: This project is not considered complete until every scrap of deaccessioned fabric has found a use. Often this means that a single deaccessioned garment may yield raw materials for multiple new items. In this instance, the garment has previously yielded three potholders.

This small blanket is made of thick blue wool. It is edged with a thin strip of blue cotton that has a decorative design machine stitched in light blue and light yellow.

During previous deconstruction, the decorative stitching and cotton strip were removed.

The Hebrew letter Shin was embroidered in white on a 3” x 1 ¼” piece of blue wool. On each of the long sides, 1/8” was folded under and sewn to a 4 ½” x ½” piece of fabric, forming a tube with a ¾” flap at each end. A second piece of 4 ½” x ½” wool was whipstitched to the back of the first. Just above the tube, the outside edges of the flap were gathered together and sewn into place. The same was done on the bottom flap. At the bottom end of the tube, a small circle of fabric was attached, closing the tube at that end. A mezuzah was purchased at David Solomon's Book Store. Although purchased flat, a prayer was said and the scrolled was rolled at the store. The rolled scroll was placed inside the tube, being careful that it was right side up and that the Sha-dai written on the outside of the scroll faced outwards. A small circular piece of fabric was sewn to the top of the tube, sealing the mezuzah case.

The accession number has been embroidered on the front of the mezuzah case.

Thursday, December 10, 2009

Moroccan Textile

Accession Number: TR8616-18


Label: 12/86, Study, Morocco ?, Conley


This 162” x 33” textile is woven from reddish-orange silk with gold stripes of varying widths. The long edges are selvage, with one having a 1 3/4” wide decorative brocade pattern woven in gold. The short edges have been formed into 5” fringe.

A machete was obtained and measured. A 20” long section was cut from the brocaded selvage. The strip was folded in half with the long edges turned inwards forming a 10” strap. The edges were topstitched. A 22 3/4” x 8 1/4” piece of fabric was cut from the textile, with one end being a selvage edge. The other end of this piece was cut into parabolic curve to reflect the shape of the machete. All raw edges were secured with a zig-zag stitch. The 10” strap was folded in half to create a loop, and then sewn to the back of the 22 3/4” x 8 1/4” piece of fabric just below the selvage end. An 8 1/4” long piece was cut from the brocaded selvage edge and sewn into place just below the selvage end on the front of the 22 3/4” x 8 1/4” piece of fabric. 1/2” of the selvage end was folded over the brocaded piece and sewn into place. The long edges and bottom of the sheath were folded under by 1/4”. The sheath was then folded in half, and the long sides and curved bottom edge were top-stitched shut. To prevent the machete from cutting the seams, four grommets were installed along the bottom edge, with a fifth in the top corner.

The accession number has been embroidered just below the brocade strip on the front of the sheath.

Thursday, December 3, 2009

James Galanos Long Coat (2nd Use)

Accession Number: M.79.239.13


Label 1: Galanos, 1967

Label 2: 2 Piece Coat, U.S.A., 1967, Galanos


Note: This project is not considered complete until every scrap of deaccessioned fabric has found a use. Often this means that a single deaccessioned garment may yield raw materials for multiple new items. In this instance, the garment has previously yielded a car seat cover.


This is a heavy, sleeveless, floor-length coat, with a matching belt. The outside is a black-and-white woven floral pattern; the inside is fully lined in a similar black fabric. The front closes with five black buttons.
During previous deconstruction, all seams were removed. The belt was left untouched.

A 1-wood (or driver) was measured and a pattern drafted consisting of three pieces: two sides following the shape of the club, and a long strip between them. After cutting the pieces out of the black lining fabric, they were partially sewn together, leaving the back of the golf club open. Three strips of elastic were sewn to the inside of the cover near the shaft end before the back was sewn shut. The shaft end of the cover was hand-hemmed. To indicate that this is a 1-wood, a single flower was cut from floral fabric and appliqu├ęd onto the head of the cover.

The accession number has been embroidered along the back of the golf club cover.

At the time of this LACMA de-accessioning, several other Galanos outfits that had originally been donated to the museum by Nancy Reagan were also deaccessioned. Those items were gifted to the Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley.